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Canadian banking system by Joseph French Johnson

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Published by Govt. print. off. in Washington .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Canada.

Subjects:

  • Banks and banking -- Canada

Book details:

Edition Notes

Bibliography: p. 138.

Statementby Joseph French Johnson...
ContributionsUnited States. National Monetary Commission.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHG2704 .J7
The Physical Object
Pagination191 p.
Number of Pages191
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL6526644M
LC Control Number10036034
OCLC/WorldCa1671422

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Canada's authoritative money and banking textbook, has been revised for a new generation of students. Readers are given a uniquely Canadian perspective of the dynamic and rapidly evolving financial system and how it's related to the aggregate economy. Emphasis is placed on structural change, globalization, and financial : Helmut Binhammer, Peter Sephton. The Canadian Banking System * match their deposit book and their mortgage book. A key regulatory difference being the inclusion of a "sunset" clause in the Canadian Bank Act that requires Author: Charles Freedman. The Bank of Canada is the nation’s central bank. We are not a commercial bank and do not offer banking services to the public. Rather, we have responsibilities for Canada’s monetary policy, bank notes, financial system, and funds management. Our principal role, as defined in the Bank of Canada Act, is "to promote the economic and financial welfare of Canada.". The Canadian Banking System. This paper examines the major changes in the Canadian banking system since the Second World War, with special attention paid to the differences between Canadian and U.S. developments over this by:

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